Anatomy of the Verb: The Gothic Verb as a Model for a by Albert L. Lloyd

By Albert L. Lloyd

The continued debate over the life or non-existence of formal verbal point in Gothic caused the writer to write down this monograph whose goal is to supply a totally new starting place for a idea of point and similar gains. Gothic, with its constrained corpus, representing a translation of the Greek, and displaying fascinating parallels with Slavic verbal buildings, serves and an illustrative version for the idea. partially I the writer argues unified concept of point, actional varieties, and verbal speed provided there possesses an inner common sense and isn't at variance with saw evidence in numerous Indo-European languages. partly II an research is gifted of the Gothic verb process which seeks to provide an explanation for the much-disputed functionality of ga- and to unravel the matter of Gothic point and actional forms which does no violence both to the Gothic textual content or the Greek unique.

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Anatomy of the Verb: The Gothic Verb as a Model for a Unified Theory of Aspect, Actional Types, and Verbal Velocity

The continued debate over the lifestyles or non-existence of formal verbal point in Gothic caused the writer to jot down this monograph whose goal is to supply a very new origin for a conception of element and similar good points. Gothic, with its restricted corpus, representing a translation of the Greek, and exhibiting attention-grabbing parallels with Slavic verbal structures, serves and an illustrative version for the speculation.

Additional resources for Anatomy of the Verb: The Gothic Verb as a Model for a Unified Theory of Aspect, Actional Types, and Verbal Velocity

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But not 'I am being sad, knowing the answer, having red hair, etc. [statals]) ; also it will be seen that they are much more likely than statals to enter into aspectual rela­ tionships. They must represent an action of some type and must therefore represent the expenditure of actional ener­ gy; yet it is difficult to discover any sign of change in most predications in which they are involved. Instead, the action consists in maintaining a p a r t i c u l a r course. , such predications have only one vector, the constant temporal velocity).

Some activities are more obviously multipartite than others because of a number of interlocking factors: 1) The alignment of the pulses. , in the direction of a particular change) and build one upon the other in a cumulative fashion, the overall cumulative change may overshadow the individual pulses. ), though actually consisting of a series of growth pulses, may well appear as a single progressive change. The action 'tremble' can hardly be so regarded. 2) The frequency of the pulses. Even pulses all tend­ ing in the same actional direction may tend to stand out as individual pulses if there is a noticeable lack of continu­ ity; the higher the frequency of the pulses, the more they appear to run together and build toward a single change.

For example, the action of 'dying' can only represent a complete change from a state of life to one of death. 6 This may be a change in the subject itself or in an object. See footnote 2. Anatomy of the Verb 30 No further change is possible and any lesser change can only be incomplete: 'dying half-way' can never represent a complete change. ' Indeed, such actions often require a special indicator to specify that not only a relatively complete, but an absolutely complete action is referred to: 'He has grown up' (so he will probably grow no more).

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